24/7 Bebenta Sa'yo

An app that translates words in real time

An app that translates words in real time

Concept illuminated power cord turns green when phone is fully charged

Concept illuminated power cord turns green when phone is fully charged

10 Ways Scientists Are Using Your Smartphone To Save The World

Pollution Monitors

image

Scientists from the University of California have developed a small smartphone add-on for monitoring air pollution. The system uses an app called CitiSense to collect data from the sensors and allows a picture of air quality to be built. This can then be viewed not just by those with the sensors, but by other users as well. Asthmatics, for example, can figure out if they should avoid a certain area that day. It also allows scientists to monitor pollution in greater detail. In San Diego, where the first trials were carried out, there are only 10 traditional stations monitoring pollution. Researchers say that if only 100 of the area’s 3.1 million residents used the device, there would be a wealth of data that is otherwise impossible to gather.

Portable Microscope

image

A portable microscope that can image a single virus has been created by scientists at UCLA. It fits on the back of a smartphone and is designed to be used in places that traditional lab equipment isn’t available. One possible use is for measuring viral loads in patient samples so that doctors in remote areas can monitor the effectiveness of treatments.A slightly less powerful microscopic imaging device has been developed by engineers from Berkely. As well as potential field research applications, they believe that the devices can be good for the wider community and with that in mind gave a bunch to schoolchildren. The kids took images of items from their everyday environment and made annotations straight onto the smartphone. The people behind the device hope it could become a valuable part of the science classroom.

Earthquakes

image

Today’s smartphones contain a device known as a MEMS accelerometer. It’s what figures out which way is up and flips the screen around accordingly. Seismologists from Italy’s National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology have used the MEMS chip from an iPhone 4 and 5 to measure earthquake-scale forces. The idea is that turning smartphones into a network of seismometers will allow emergency response teams to quickly pinpoint an earthquake’s epicenter and get resources to the right places more quickly. Previous work has shown that the accelerometers can tell the difference between earthquake vibrations and everyday movements such as running.Other scientists hope to use the technology to create an early warning network. Collecting data from a large number of phones would allow scientists to predict where an earthquake is going to strike next and send a warning to anyone that has the app installed. Earthquake early warning systems have been shown to save lives, so utilizing smartphones is a cheap way of introducing the technology to areas without the need for new hardware.

Read More

Via 24/7 Bebenta Sa'yo